Category Archives: Percy Jackson

May 16, 2009

Trivia Answer: Percy Jackson & The Olympians

Posted by at 6:26 am in Percy Jackson, Trivia | Permalink

Lightennigtheif_130Wow! That was impressive. Congratulations to Jacob, who nailed every question of my my Lightning Thief trivia — and answered only a few minutes after the post went up! To recap, here are the questions and Jacob’s absolutely correct answers:

1. What was the Roman (not Greek!) name for Percy’s father? – Neptune

2. What is the first hint we get of who Percy’s father really is? – When Percy doused the Cabin 5 kids in bathroom water (although we also get a much smaller hint earlier when Percy mentions that the only activity he’s good at is canoeing)

3. Which monster is Percy’s namesake famous for killing? – Medusa

4. Which three planets are named after Percy’s father and uncles? – Jupiter, Neptune, and Pluto

5. Why is the entrance to the underworld in L.A.? (Feel free to be creative with this one.) – The entrance to the Underworld is always in the west.

6. Where did Percy stab Ares, and what classical hero is this a reference to? – Heel; Achilles

Way to go, Jacob! I’ll have to make the questions harder after I read Sea of Monsters . . .

— Jack, STACKS Staffer

May 3, 2009

Trivia: Percy Jackson and the Olympians

Posted by at 7:40 am in Percy Jackson, Trivia | Permalink

Lightennigtheif_130Happy spring, Splotters! I celebrated the arrival of warm weather (FINALLY) by heading to a rope swing over a river with a bunch of friends, and I recommend you do something similarly spontaneous to officially mark the changing of the seasons. In honor of that aquatic adventure, and as a promised follow-up to my review of The Lightning Thief, I’d like to present Ink Splot 26′s first ever Percy Jackson trivia!

1. What was the Roman (not Greek!) name for Percy’s father?

2. What is the first hint we get of who Percy’s father really is?

3. Which monster is Percy’s namesake famous for killing?

4. Which three planets are named after Percy’s father and uncles?

5. Why is the entrance to the underworld in L.A.? (Feel free to be creative with this one.)

6. Where did Percy stab Ares, and what classical hero is this a reference to?

Good luck! I’ll post the answers in a week.

— Jack, STACKS Staffer

April 28, 2009

Book Rec: Percy Jackson and the Olympians

Posted by at 7:07 am in Percy Jackson, Reads | Permalink

Lightennigtheif_130One of the most common suggestions our friendly forum-goers give is the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series. Well, I found myself with nothing to read recently, and after seeing the 10th comment in one day that basically went, “OMG PJ IS SOOO GOOD!” I figured I’d give it a shot.

“PJ” is by Rick Riordan of The 39 Clues fame. Once I found that out, I was already excited. Maze of Bones, Rick’s entrée into the 39 Clues series, was a great blend of action, history, and humor. I expected the same from the first book in the PJ series, The Lightning Thief, and I was not let down. Right off the bat, you like Percy. He’s funny, brave, a little rebellious, and a good guy when it counts. (Might sound obvious, but that’s really important. A good story is nothing if you don’t like its hero.) And when things in his life get crazy — I don’t want to spoil anything, but suffice it to say that at one point early on he’s forced to defend himself from his math teacher with a sword — he takes it all in stride.

Pjato_book1 I should mention the coolest part about the book, of course: it’s all about Greek mythology. Percy is the son of one of the 12 major gods (Zeus, Hermes, Aphrodite, Ares, Poseidon . . . ), and has the powers to prove it. Of course, there’s no point in giving a character powers unless you’re going to throw him at some horrific monsters and devious, plotting gods, so you know right away he’s going to run into trouble. And when he does, Riordan lives up to his reputation: the plot, and the individual scenes that make it up, are fun and fast-paced.

Again, I refuse to be one of those guys who gives the plot away during a review, so you’ll have to mostly take my word for it. But the way that Rick blends stories and creatures from classical mythology with the modern day elevates the book from a by-the-numbers hero story to something that feels really fresh and inventive. Percy’s journey mirrors that of classic Greek heroes like Jason or Hercules — a deliberate choice, no doubt — and having that kind of story updated for the new millennium turns out to be just as much fun as you’d expect.

The Lightning Thief is highly recommended, and I’ll definitely be continuing on to the rest of the series. I got the same tingles as I did when I read Harry Potter for the first time, and I need to know where the story goes!

Have you read The Lightning Thief? What did you think? What was your favorite part? (Mine was the scene in the statue shop.) Tell me in the comments!

— Jack, STACKS Staffer