Author Archives: scholastickids

July 13, 2016

Time Travel Book Wars

Posted by at 1:40 am in Kid Power, Reads | Permalink

The Time Patrol (for ages 12 and up) by Poul Anderson. The Time Machine (for ages 12 and up) by H. G. Wells. One is a collection of stories. The other is a short novel. Both are science fiction about time travel, but that is just about the only thing these books have in common.

Both are extremely good reads, though neither is suitable for a very young audience. The Time Machine is dense and takes a while to build up to the action. The Time Patrol deals a lot with time travel-related paradoxes, which can get confusing, and has some violence and some adult language.

The Time Machine is about a man in the late nineteenth century who builds a time machine. He travels to the year Eight Hundred and Two Thousand Seven Hundred and One A.D. (802,701). The book tells the story of his adventures with the people there, who are a greatly evolved version of the human race.

The Time Patrol is about Manse Everard, a man from the mid-twentieth century, who is recruited into the Time Patrol, an organization created to prevent anyone from changing history. The book has tales of his different missions.

If I had to pick which one I liked better, I probably would go with The Time Patrol, but I don’t want to rank them. They’re too different to pick a favorite. Both have excitement, but The Time Patrol has more. It also exercised my logic skills with time travel confusion. The Time Machine is more philosophical.

The Time Patrol and The Time Machine have a bit more in common than I said at first–they are both definitely worth reading.

Julie, Scholastic Kids Council

July 11, 2016

The Road Less Traveled Writing Prompt

Posted by at 1:53 am in Kid Power, Writing Prompt | Permalink

There is a famous poem by Robert Frost called “The Road Not Taken.” Here is a quote:

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I –
I took the one less traveled by,”

2 paths diverged in the woodsMany people interpret the poem to mean that if you see 2 paths, you should take the less common path because it might lead you to new adventures that you would not experience if you just follow the same road as everyone else. You know, be original and follow your own dreams, not someone else’s.

William has a different idea, though. He just wants to take the shortest road. Maybe there is some pizza waiting at the end of his road, or something.

What about you? What road will YOU take? Write your ending to this sentence :

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I . . . 

Leave your answers in the Comments!

July 6, 2016

Book Wars: The Giver and Divergent

Posted by at 1:43 am in Kid Power, Reads | Permalink

Choose a faction that micromanages your life, or have your whole life planned ahead of you by some old people who spy on you. Which one would you choose? Have you heard of the books The Giver and Divergent (both for ages 12 and up)?  Most of you are going to have some of those lazy summer days when time feels so slow. I would totally recommend these books to anyone looking for great summer reads.

These are incredibly good books, full of plot twists and suspense that will keep you on the edge of your seat until you finish them. Both of them have been made into movies, but books are (almost) always better than the movies, so make sure you read the books first. Both of these books are first books of series, The Giver is followed by Gathering Blue, Messenger, and Son, and Divergent is followed by Insurgent and Allegiant.

The setting in The Giver and in Divergent are dystopian societies where everything is bad or unpleasant and there is something huge about the characters’ lives and their societies that is being kept from them.

Jonas and Tris are the protagonists of The Giver and Divergent. A big day is upon Tris at the start of Divergent. She must take an aptitude test to see which faction she fits into. Then she must choose her faction. Jonas is turning 12, and must receive his future career chosen by the Council of Elders. When both Jonas and Tris find out their society’s secrets, their lives are changed forever and they both try to help fix the rest of their civilization.

Both Jonas and Tris stand out from the others in their societies. Tris is “divergent”, while Jonas doesn’t have the most normal job. Tris is born into the faction Abnegation, which is all about selflessness and caring about others before you think about yourself. Both societies are trying to implement selflessness, but go way too far. For example, if you are a member of Abnegation, you cannot look at yourself in the mirror. Jonas is given lots of power after receiving his job, while Tris finds herself in danger.

So, would you rather read Divergent, The Giver, or both? Leave your thoughts in the Comments!

Alex, Scholastic Kids Council

June 30, 2016

Basketball

Posted by at 1:57 am in Games, Kid Power | Permalink

Basketball

Basketball has had a huge impact on my life since I was in kindergarten. My mother and father told me that, when I was little, I would ask to sleep with my basketball and that I went through a couple of months where I bounced my basketball everywhere I went!

I play for a summer team, a travel team, a school team, and an A.A.U. team. I love all four of them. When I am having a bad day, and I know I have basketball practice later, it makes my day so much better.

One reason why I love basketball so much is because the game never stops. The ball is always moving, and the game moves fast. I play point guard, which means I have to work on my ball handling skills a lot. I have lots of fun practicing, even when I am alone.

I love to watch basketball too. It is so entertaining to watch. My favorite team is the Golden State Warriors. I love to watch Stephen Curry play, and try to imitate his moves. So make sure that you try out basketball soon because I know you will have lots of fun.

Leah, Scholastic Kids Council

June 29, 2016

Shark Books for Kids

Posted by at 1:22 am in Reads | Permalink

If you can’t get enough of Shark Week, here are some books to fuel your obsession.

10 True Tales: Surviving Sharks By Allan Zullo for Ages 8–12

Can you imagine getting bitten by a shark? Or having an elephant try to trample you? Or running for your life from a cougar? This book contains ten true stories of real-life survivors of attacks by some of the animal kindgom’s scariest predators!

Into the Killing Seas By Michael P. Spradlin for Ages 8–12

Stranded in the war-torn Pacific, Patrick and his younger brother Teddy are finally homeward-bound. They’ve stowed away on one of the U.S. Navy’s finest ships, and now they just need to stay hidden. But Japanese torpedoes rip their dream apart. And the sinking ship isn’t the worst of it. No, the real danger circles beneath the surface. And it has teeth . . .

Deep Dive #4: Kraya the Blood Shark By Adam Blade  for Ages 7-10

Max and Lia have tracked the evil Professor to his lair in the Black Caves. Neither of them is ready for what awaits them there. Kraya the Blood Shark, with his razor sharp teeth and laser cannons, is the most vicious of all the Robobeasts. Max must survive if he wants to finally come face-to-face with the Professor to save his father and retrieve the fourth and final piece of the Skull of Thallos. But there are still some secrets Max has not uncovered, and they could lead to Max’s defeat.

Jack Gets a Clue #4: The Case of the Loose-Toothed Shark By Nancy Krulik, Illustrated by Gary Lacoste for Ages 7-10

When a giant shark tooth fossil went missing during my little sister Mia’s birthday party at the aquarium, I found myself in really deep water—the aquarium staff accused me of stealing it. No way would I steal something, even if it was a cool fossil. What I could do, though, was talk to the animals at the aquarium to find out who the real thief was. My brainiac detective partner Elizabeth and I would have to work fast to clear my name before the end of the day.

Scholastic Discover More: Sharks By Penelope Arlon  for Ages 7-10

Sharks are incredible creatures and we are just beginning to understand their complex lives. Thorough, up-to-date information is combined with cutting-edge facts about sharks’ amazing memories, shark no-go zones, and cleaners and clingers-on: fish that travel with and attend sharks. The book encourages an active response: sharks are endangered and here’s what you can do about it.

I Survived #2: I Survived the Shark Attack of 1916 By Lauren Tarshis for Ages 8-12

In the summer of 1916, ten-year-old Chet Roscow is captivated by the local news: a Great White shark has been attacking and killing people up and down the Atlantic Coast, not far from Chet’s hometown of Springfield, New Jersey. Then one day, swimming with his friends, Chet sees something in the water. . .

June 14, 2016

Insect Trivia Quiz

Posted by at 1:20 am in Trivia | Permalink

insectQuiz: How Well Do You Know Bugs?

1. Which story does NOT feature a ladybug as a main character? A) James and The Giant Peach. B) A Bug’s Life. C) Pokémon. D) Harry Potter.

2. The fear of spiders is called: A) Arachnophobia. B) Acrophobia. C) Acarophobia. D) Agoraphobia.

3. Which insect builds a cocoon and transforms itself into a butterfly? A) Ant. B) Mite. C) Caterpillar. D) Ladybug.

4. Which bug harbors the bacterium in its stomach that causes Lyme Disease? A) Roaches. B) Deer ticks. C) Bees. D) Crickets.

5. Which insect’s lifespan depends mostly on temperature, humidity, and its ability to successfully obtain blood for food? A) Wasps. B) Maggots. C) Mosquitoes. D) June beetles.

6. Which insect lives among human hairs and feeds on extremely small amounts of blood drawn from the scalp? A) Lice. B) Termites. C) Worms. D) Pill bugs.

7. How many eyes do spiders usually have? A) Eight. B) Seven. C) Three. D) None.

8. Which insect has earned the nickname “pincher bug”? A) Earwigs. B) Yellow jackets. C) Fleas. D) Ants.

9. Which insects create societies most closely paralleling those created by humans? Hint, this insect has roles nicknamed: “workers,” “soldiers,” and “queens.” A) Silk worms. B) Centipedes. C) Ants. D) Flies.

10. A firefly is part of which family of insects? A) Beetles. B) Flies. C) Bees. D) Butterflies.

Read on for the answers. Continue reading

June 9, 2016

Coins for Cancer Campaign

Posted by at 1:11 am in Kid Power | Permalink

Start Your Own Coins for Cancer Campaign

Cancer is a pressing issue around the world right now, and we need to do something to stop it. All cancers are a problem, but there are some that are more lethal than others. Brain Cancer is one of these cancers that are very harmful and lethal. Researchers and scientists are doing everything they can to find a cure, but even with over 60 years of time, we haven’t made enough progress.

 A lot of people hear stories about young people being diagnosed with cancer, and they fight through it and survive, but that isn’t everyone. Most patients diagnosed with cancer end up succumbing to it. This is why we need to find a cure. Researchers and scientists can help exterminate this horrible disease by receiving increased funds that help them conduct more research, increase clinical trial studies, and upgrade their equipment to assist with developing a cure.

Citizens like you can help this cause by donating money to researchers, scientists, non-profit groups and proton therapy centers. You can also help by raising awareness about this disease around your community, and by supporting patients that have been diagnosed with this disease. I think that everyone needs to play a part in this fight against cancer. Even if it is something small, like having a bake sale where funds go to cancer research, everything counts.

Ask your parents and teachers to help you start your own campaign to help raise money and donate it to a research organization!

Alex, Scholastic Kids Council

June 8, 2016

Harry Potter Kid Review

Posted by at 1:01 am in Harry Potter, Reads | Permalink

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Ever read a book where the main character lives with mean relatives because something happened to his or her parents? That’s how Harry Potter’s life has been for all of his eleven years. He must endure life with his aunt’s family, the Dursleys, who make him sleep in the cupboard under the stairs. He only has extremely faint memories of his parents, whom he was told died in a car crash.

One day, he gets a letter addressed to his cupboard. Before he can read it, his uncle tears it up. But the letters keep coming, and Harry’s aunt and uncle become terrified. They run from the letters to a small hut on a small rocky island.

Harry realizes that his eleventh birthday is coming up tomorrow. He counts down the minutes and seconds as he tries to fall asleep.

At midnight exactly, Harry and the Dursleys receive a surprise — a surprise that whisks Harry away to a world of magic. He learns about his parents and so much more.

But there’s a villain on the loose — the man who murdered Harry’s parents. The clock is ticking, and few know his plans.

My mom had trouble getting into the first book, and it took her a few tries. She’s very glad she stuck with it. If you don’t like it at first, just push through the first few chapters. The first time I read this book, I was in first grade. I have read it many times since, and have read all of the books in the series at least once. The last four are a little darker, but I was fine with them.

The book Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone by J.K. Rowling is amazingly well written, and expresses old concepts in new ways. It brings together bravery, friendship, and knowing whom to trust. This book would be great for anyone who wants to escape into another world. If you already love Harry, then you can go to the Harry Potter Message Board to chat with other Harry Potter fans.

Julie, Scholastic Kids Council