Author Archives: Scholastic News Kids Press Corps

November 22, 2015

The Letter Writer

Posted by at 12:08 pm in News | Permalink
Scholastic News Kids Press Corps The Letter Writer by Adedayo Perkovich

Olivia B. is only 12 years old, but she has already gotten the attention of a presidential candidate. Last month, she wrote a letter to Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton about the importance of a good education for children with learning disabilities. Olivia’s letter went viral after Secretary Clinton posted it on Twitter. Olivia even got to go to Clinton’s birthday party and take a selfie with her. Continue reading

November 19, 2015


Posted by at 1:34 am in News | Permalink
Scholastic News Kids Press CorpsKidZania by Georgia Limcaoco

What do you want to be when you grow up? Children all over the world dream of the future, what they will do, and what jobs they will have. Now, these dreams can become a reality at KidZania (kid-ZAH-nee-ya). Opened last August in Manila, the interactive kid-sized city combines role-playing activities and real-life experiences to simulate the real world for children ages four to fourteen. Continue reading

November 15, 2015

A Hunger Games Tour

Scholastic News Kids Press CorpsA Hunger Games Tour by Jordan Mundy

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be on the set where your favorite book-turned-movie was filmed? I recently got the chance to visit the forest whereThe Hunger Games movie (rated PG-13) was filmed. I got to see the very place where Jennifer Lawrence acted as Katniss Everdeen and ran from the fireballs in the Arena. I acted out the scene where Josh Hutcherson portrayed Peeta Mellark, who was using camouflage to hide from the other tributes. It wasn’t on a set in Hollywood or New York City, but instead, in DuPont State Recreational Forest in North Carolina. Continue reading

November 1, 2015

Scoring Goals and Writing Books

Scholastic News Kids Press CorpsScoring Goals and Writing Books by Joshua Yi

What does it mean to be a superstar? For many people, it’s about being great at one thing, whether it’s sports, music, or something else. When this reporter interviewed Frank Lampard at Yankee Stadium recently, a different definition emerged. Lampard excels at both sports and writing. Not only does he score goals for New York City FC (a professional soccer team), he also writes children’s books.
Joshua in the press room at Yankee Stadium

Lampard has written three books for a series called Frankie’s Magic Soccer Ball (Scholastic), with more titles on the way. Before a match between New York City FC and the San Jose Earthquakes at Yankee Stadium, the superstar took time to share his story.

Lampard began his soccer career in his native England, where the sport is called football. A midfielder for Chelsea Football Club for 13 years, he has scored more goals than anyone in the team’s history. Whether winning or losing, Lampard said, “good sportsmanship and respecting your opponent” are essential.

Last summer, Lampard moved to the United States to play for New York City FC, a Major League Soccer (MLS) team. He loves the city, saying, “I enjoy how friendly everybody is.” Having long watched MLS games, he often dreamed of coming to the U.S. and “was quite inspired when David Beckham came here and did so well.”


But a star athletic career was not enough for Lampard. So he turned to writing children’s books. “I wanted to do something constructive, fun, and different from football,” he said. In the popular series that Lampard created, a magic soccer ball helps Frankie, the main character, and his friends journey back in time. They play soccer matches against ancient Romans, pirates, and even cowboys. Can you imagine playing soccer at the Roman Colosseum?

The series combines sports, history, and friendship—plus a talking dog. Thirteen books have been published in England, where the series is called Frankie’s Magic Football. As for the secret to Lampard’s own success, this reporter found no magic. “To be successful in anything,” Lampard said, “the idea is the same for everything you do—hard work and practice.”

July 7, 2011

Kid Review: Stargirl

Stargirl Kid Reporter's summer reads include Jerry Spinelli's classic, Stargirl.

"She was elusive. She was today. She was the faintest scent of a cactus flower, the fitting shadow of an elf owl. We did not know what to make of her. In our minds we tried to pin her to a corkboard like a butterfly, but the pin merely went through and away she flew."

She was Stargirl.

For a day, I was tangled in the pages of Stargirl, a book written by Jerry Spinelli. I sat on my bed and couldn't stop reading. Spinelli doesn't drag you from chapter to chapter — he has you running to catch up.

Stargirl is a book about a girl who's different from anyone else. In the book, Stargirl has been home-schooled all her life. At her new school, everyone is the same and only cares about their own business.

The other kids are shocked when Stargirl sings "Happy Birthday" in the cafeteria with her ukulele to people she doesn't know, leaves packages and gifts on doorsteps with no card, and cheers for both teams at sporting events. They don't know what to make of someone so different, and as the story unfolds Stargirl has to make a decision about just how important being "accepted" really is.

She was different all right, and I would recommend Stargirl to anyone because the book is different, too. It didn't have any adventure or big action scenes, but I still couldn't put the book down. The writing is radiant, and the characters seem so real.

Everyone is different, and everyone has a Stargirl inside of them. Reading this book, the Stargirl that's in you will come out.

Get the latest on national and international events, movies, television, music, sports, and more from the Scholastic News Kids Press Corps.

 — Chloe Jones, Scholastic News Kids Press Reporter

January 21, 2009

President Obama’s Inauguration

Posted by at 12:41 pm in News | Permalink

Scholastic News Kid Reporters covered the 2008 presidential election from start to finish. Over the weekend, they headed to the nation’s capital to report on the inaugural events and the swearing-in ceremony itself. Here are some of their reflections on the historic moment.

Some had tickets to stand near reflecting pools, monuments, and the capitol. Some even had seats. Most of us in the crowd of 2 million had a little piece of land no bigger than our two feet planted firmly side by side. That small area of personal space shifted as more people crammed onto the National Mall, but it never grew any bigger. In fact, it just kept on shrinking to the point that you couldn’t lift your arms up to scratch your ear.

Inauguration_smAs we watched dignitaries take their seats, helicopters flew overhead. We had no cell service. No way to twitter, no way for the
three Kid Reporters on the mall to text each other their positions.

The Jumbotron speakers caught every sound. Hillary Clinton, soon to be Secretary of State, walked out in a bright blue coat. Former
President Bill Clinton was at her side in a black coat with a bright yellow scarf. We could hear the click of Hillary’s heels echo in the halls of power.

The sun was shining, though there were a few wisps of clouds in the sky. Later, the sky would turn gray, and the temperatures would drop, but spirits remained high.

As we stand there waiting for history to unfold, I realize that this is our spot, right here, on the frozen ground, surrounded by somber museums housing the ghosts of our ancestors. This spot, right here is the one we have worked for hours to claim. It is where we have finally landed after following the person in front of us who was following the person in front of her. And behind you thousands more follow, marching in your footsteps.

They all get their spot, like my spot, in history. It is a community gathering of complete strangers with a common interest more than 200 years old. This is where we will witness the dignity and honor of the peaceful transfer of power. This is America.

— Christina Dillard, Madison Hartke-Weber, Quinn Jacobson, Jimmy Pitenis, Scholastic News Kid Reporters

Photo Credit: ©Jim Young/Reuters