August 9, 2012

Military Working Dogs

Posted by at 1:37 am in Kid Power | Permalink

Make_a_differenceMilitary Working Dogs

Dogs are the most common pets in the United States, but did you know that they have also been fighting alongside the U.S. military forces since the Civil War? They officially became part of the military during World War II, and today are invaluable members of military groups stationed around the world.

Find out more about these amazing heroes, and how YOU can help them after they retire. . .

  • Because dogs have nearly 50 times as many smell receptors as humans, they are able to sniff out Militarydog danger before soldiers are put in harm’s way. In the future, trainers hope to be able to teach dogs to sniff out land mines and dangerous chemicals.
  • Since they can see better in the dark than humans, they can check out dark spaces and make sure they are safe for soldiers to enter.
  • Dogs are better at finding booby traps, hidden people, and explosives than any military-developed robot!
  • Dogs can run twice as fast as humans, and have powerful jaws that they use to hold on to suspects who are trying to flee the scene.

Dogs, like people, have to retire at some point when they get too old to work. After working so hard for the military, it must be nice to finally have a chance to be a normal dog! A law passed in 2000 made it possible for people like you and me to adopt retired military dogs! 

If you are interested in adopting a retired Military Working Dog (MWD), have your parent or guardian contact your local MWD facility and ask for an application. Let’s help these brave soldiers find the forever homes they deserve!

En-Szu, STACKS Intern (a.k.a. MidnightMagic5)

Image courtesy Scholastic News

Add a Comment

For your safety, comments will not appear until the moderator has approved them.
Comments may be edited for appropriateness and personal information.

  1. Aquadolphin1868

    This is an amazing story about dogs i love dogs more now and that story has great facts nice job :)

    Reply